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He adjective heptasyllable It is used to qualify what you have seven syllables . It can also be used as a noun to refer to the verse with this amount of syllables.

A heptasyllable, therefore, is a verse of seven syllables . Depending on tradition or style, it can be combined with a pentasyllable (five syllables) or with a endecasílabo (eleven syllables), giving rise to different kinds of stanzas.

A example Heptasyllable verse is as follows: “Caduco god and raptor”. As you can see, this Spanish verse Luis de Gongora , which is part of a poem known as "Leave me alone tyrant love" or “Blind that you aim and hit”, presents seven syllables: "Ca-du-co god and ra-peace".

Usually the hemistichs of the Alexandrian verses They are also heptasyllables. Hemistichs are the halves or fragments of a verse. Since the Alexandrian consists of fourteen syllables, it is usual for each hemistich to have seven syllables (that is, it is heptasyllable).

Let's look at the Alexandrian case “The pearl of your dreams is hysterical”, verse included in the poem "To Columbus" of the Nicaraguan Ruben Dario . Presents fourteen syllables (“The pearl of your dreams is u-na his-té-ri-ca”) and can be divided into two hemistichs ("The pearl of your dreams / is hysterical"). If we analyze each hemistich, we will notice that these are heptasyllable verses (“The pearl of your dreams / is u-na his-té-ri-ca”).

According to specialists, the first heptasyllable verses in our language date from XII century . Then they were deprecated until the Renaissance , when they were reused regularly.

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